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Indonesian Coffee Will Gradually Enter the Qatari Market

Qatar has brought in coffee worth $19.2 million from all across the world

  • Publish date: Monday، 04 July 2022
Indonesian Coffee Will Gradually Enter the Qatari Market
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One of the biggest producers and exporters of coffee in the world, Indonesia, predicts a significant increase in coffee exports to Qatar in the coming months.

Ridwan Hassan, the Indonesian ambassador to Qatar, made the comments on Thursday at the "Indonesian Coffee O'Clock" gathering held at the InterContinental Doha.

Given the expansion of coffee shops and roasteries throughout the nation, as well as the rising popularity of coffee, the diplomat stated, "We would want to see more Indonesian coffee here in Qatar."

Given the expansion of coffee shops and roasteries throughout the nation, as well as the rising popularity of coffee, the diplomat stated, "We would want to see more Indonesian coffee here in Qatar."

The fact that Indonesian coffee "not only provides[s] the pleasure of flavor but also cultural identity," he continued, makes it special. Coffee can grow quite well in Indonesia thanks to the favorable environment there as well as the blessing of its hilly regions.

In Indonesia, you can find a variety of complex, syrupy, low-acid, often quite dense coffees that are ideal for dark roasting.

This quality is partly attributable to the well-known usage of a local processing technique known as "giling basah."

Wet-hulling, or giling basah, is a semi-washed method that is used to process practically all of the coffee in the area.

By letting the coffee cherry dry for a while before being cleaned and totally removed, this method imparts some of the qualities of the pulp and fruit to the bean.

The specialty cultivars come from a variety of Indonesian provinces, including Gayo, Flores, Sidikalang, Toraja, and of course Java. Every specialty has its own distinctive aroma and flavor, according to Hassan.

The ambassador also emphasized the rise in specialty coffee exports from Indonesia, particularly its "speciality arabica," which has become well-known around the world due to its over 100 genetic variations.

The envoy claims that just a "very small" portion of Qatar's $19.2 million worth of coffee imports from other countries are from Indonesia.

According to him, there are still plenty of chances in Qatar for Indonesian coffee, especially the specialty arabica variety.

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According to statistics source Statistica, the United States was Indonesia's top coffee export destination in 2021 with a volume of approximately 57.69 thousand metric tons.

Indonesia exported a total of 380.17 million metric tonnes of coffee in that year.

The Indonesian Ministry of Trade said that in 2021, the nation exported coffee worth $842.5 million.

The ambassador aspires for the "Indonesian Coffee O'Clock" event to give Indonesian coffee a platform to spread its reputation, particularly in Qatar, "and reach more people and more lives, the lives of the farmers and the hearts of the coffee lovers."

The event featured presentations from Songoaji and Keke Roastery, two Qatar-based coffee entrepreneurs, as well as Javanero Indonesia, a representative of the Indonesian coffee industry, explaining the theories and expertise behind their nation's coffee.

A number of government leaders and businesses attended the event, and four baristas also demonstrated their abilities there.